Lost Art and Everyday Sexism: This Week in Books

676x380Words by Billie Jenkins

This week saw the release of two great books, the first Everyday Sexism by Laura Bates

Search #shoutingback on Twitter and you’ll see Laura Bates has already made quite a stir. There’s an endless list of women reporting on their experiences of a daily struggle against the attitudes and behaviour they encounter just for being a certain sex. You might have heard of Laura Bates before, as a young journalist she spearheaded the Everyday Sexism project after being harassed on the tube. If you haven’t heard of her you have almost defiantly felt her effects in the confidence of women to speaking out against unfair treatment. The project is now an internationally recognised movement. The new book Everyday Sexism collects together experiences recorded by the online community which has formed in the projects wake, some harrowing, some hilarious with underlying implications. Today feminism is as much about reclaiming the small victories as combatting institutionalised problems such as equal pay. The Everyday Sexism Project has captured that idea perfectly, now let its book capture you.

lost_art_1-940x527
And the second exciting release: Lost Art by Jennifer Mundy

Yesterday saw the release of Lost Art, the printed aftermath of the Tate’s online exhibition documenting modern art that has disappeared, been destroyed, or thieved. As well as the titillating subject matter (the naughtiness of art thievery, the passionate act of destroying something so emotionally potent), it’s a really fascinating idea. Through photographic representations, fact and myth, essays and discussions of missing work by those who experienced it portraits are built of work that no longer exists to us. There are a slew of big names, Bacon, Duchamp, Miro and Emin all feature. It’s an unusually thorough and intellectual light shone on a significant aspect of art in context. The exhibition reached over 3.4 million visitors and was featured by over 900 media outlets. We’ve put ours on the birthday list.

 

Related posts: