Fat kids and Fashion

Words by Billie Jenkins

There are moments when someone drunkenly makes a contribution to a late night argument that is so off-point and misinformed that all who caught wind of it hold their breathe waiting to see who is going to pull the trigger of common sense, and in doing so take the happiness of the source as collateral damage for the evening. The obesity campaigners who have latched onto the latest Moschino range, which recreates the infamous McDonalds branding in the fashion houses image, have made the same social faux pas, but on an international stage. Obesity expert Dr Ian Campbell weighs in with the argument that if children see the range, which is a high street knock off goldmine, as desirable, aspirational objects, they are ’buying into the whole fast-food concept’.
Campbell gets top marks for effort, he has he achieved national media attention for his cause by tying it to an internationally reported event, Paris Fashion Week. However the journalists who have picked up on the story, and have produced articles that are equal parts obesity statistics, fashion reporting and ott soundbites, do not get top marks. Under scrutiny the link between a rework of one of the most recognisable brand identities of all time for playful fashion purposes, and the fact children may access and enjoy images of celebrities wearing the items, or own similar items themselves, is a tenuous one. Once framed in the context of a high fashion environment the argument becomes irrelevant. Do we really think children, duped by the idea that a red background with a yellow M is the height of cool, will be desperate to consume cheeseburgers and gargle on watery coke? The Golden Arches are already buried in the collective subconscious, it’s barely the Cambridge rapist. Then again it’s nice to hear someone worrying about the fatty in fashion, rather than a tired article saying ’arn’t models a bit to thin’. And anyway, after spending £45 on an IPhone case even the Poundsaver menu is stretching my budget.

 

 

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